Sandy likes that Cefaly Offers Drug-Free Migraine Relief

Cefaly device

First Name: Sandy
Age: 63
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Years with Migraines: 40+
Occupation: Retired, formerly an Intelligence analyst with the Drug Enforcement Administration for 34 years

How long have you had migraines?
I have been getting migraines since the mid 1970s. They have increased in frequency. Since I moved to Florida I generally have them every day from April until September/October due to the humidity. I am considering moving to Nevada but I also have a disorder of the immune system called Sjogren’s, so it might cause other issues to get worse. The barometric pressure is a trigger as well.

When do you usually get migraines? 
The barometric pressure and high humidity are factors. Foods do not seem to be triggers at all.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I have tried neurotoxin injections and triptans. I am currently taking a prescription drug as a migraine preventive that’s often used to prevent epileptic seizures. I have a prescription for a triptan as a rescue medication if all else fails. I don’t like to use the triptan because it makes me feel weird. I also have an ice pack that I can “velcro” around my head that is pretty effective (my low tech attack). The triptan is the last thing I use. If it’s the heavy humidity sometimes nothing works. I am anxiously waiting for the infusion studies being done by the FDA. They look promising.

What does your migraine feel like?
The pain is usually on the right side of my head and it feels like a vice is wrapped around my head and is slowly tightening to the point where my head is going to explode. Many times I wish it would. On a scale of 1 to 10 it’s about a 14.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My brother worked for the FDA at the time it received approval by the FDA. He knew I got migraines and told me about it. I spoke to my neurologist about it and he provided a prescription.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
It has mostly been effective. Because I live in Florida and my problem is the humidity the relief is sometimes only temporary because the humidity is a constant. I’ve used the Cefaly up to twice in one day. I’ve been using the device about two years and I have the newer version of the Cefaly now.Iit took about a week to get use to the sensation. I couldn’t let the device run its full course for about a week, it was too much but I’m very used to it now. The phase near the end is still a bit intense but I can handle it. For the most part my migraines are a reaction to the weather. I do not use the Cefaly unless I have a headache, so in that regard the Cefaly has no effect on the number of headaches I experience. I like the Cefaly as a treatment option because unlike the triptan (my treatment of last resort) it doesn’t make me feel weird. I take a lot of medications for a variety of other issues and would like to avoid taking any thing else if possible.

What made you want to share your story?
Migraines are awful and anything that helps should be put out there to a wide audience so everyone that suffers can become aware.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Hannah: ‘I honestly could not cope without my Cefaly’

Name: Hannah
Age: 34
Location: North Little Rock, Arkansas
Years with Migraines: 8
Occupation: Online learning for National Guard

How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraines since 2009. 

When do you usually get migraines?
The migraines come in waves. I might not get them for 2 weeks, and then I’ll get them every day for a week and a half. There are certain triggers, like red wine (sometimes it causes one and sometimes it doesn’t), but the migraines have been so difficult to diagnose for me because they are so incredibly random. They come in waves. When I have them for a 2 week wave, for example, I get them every day.  I have tried to link them to EVERYTHING, but there are NO clear patterns. The exception is weather fronts – this seems to make them worse.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I have tried EVERYTHING, excluding surgery for migraines. I’ve had every test run; I’ve tried every medicine on the market. Most migraine medicines don’t work for me. A few medicines help somewhat, like an anti-epileptic medication and a tricyclic antidepressant for prevention. Medical neurotoxin injections helps some with prevention as well, so I get those every 3 months. I’ve tried lidocaine shots, chiropractic therapy, myofascial release, acupuncture, and every herb and supplement that exists that’s known to help.

What does your migraine feel like?
The migraines originate either in the back of my head (neck area) or on top of my head. They start out small and grow in intensity. My head is filled with pressure. I never have a headache that goes away on its own. Every one turns into a migraine.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
I discovered Cefaly while researching migraine fixes.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I honestly could not cope without my Cefaly. I thank God for it. I realize this may not be protocol, but when I have migraines, I wear it all day long. It covers the pain. I’m able to function when I’m wearing it. When I would normally be lying down with an eye mask and ice pack. I think Cefaly 2 is SO much better. Being able to use it while lying down is a massive benefit. I’m able to wear my Cefaly and get work done. It prevents me from having to call in sick. My co-workers call it “the mind-reading device”. Lol. I’m happy to wear my “crazy contraption” in the office because I’m so thankful for it!!

What made you want to share your story?
I want to share my story because the Cefaly has helped so much with the pain. And it’s allowed me to go to work instead of calling in sick.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Karen: I believe in Cefaly

Cefaly device

Name: Karen
Age: 71
Location: San Diego, California
Years with Migraines: 45-50 years
Occupation: Retired Educator

How long have you had migraines?
I started having migraines in my 20s but I did not realize they were migraines. It’s funny I didn’t think about migraine because my father had migraines! Migraines did not occur often in my 20s and 30s. I was a teacher, and would have horrible headaches and  come home trying to figure out what do for the pain. The headaches would last three days. I remember I would lie down with my head off the end of the bed, upside down, and think this is the worst headache in the world. After three days they would magically go away but I didn’t do anything other than maybe take an aspirin.

When do you usually get migraines?
There is no specific thing that causes my migraines, it’s usually a combination of two or three things that build up and bring on my migraines. It’s like hitting the jackpot on a slot machine but not in a good way — once all those cherries are lined up, I have a migraine that goes on for three or four days. I moved from the northwest (Salem, Oregon & Seattle) to San Diego, California, and the weather here affects me. The Santa Ana winds — that’s one of the big ‘cherries’ on the slot machine. Another ‘cherry’ eating or drinking something that reacts like a trigger, such as red or white wine. For instance, Avocados are one of my triggers, which is crazy because we grow avocado trees and I can’t eat any of my own avocados. Light is also a horrible trigger. In fact, I wear special sunglasses that help filter the blue rays. As a teacher I would be under fluorescent lighting all day, and I believe that is one of the worst lights for migraines. When taught, sometimes I would turn off half the lights in the room and it created a comfortable room. The students also seemed to be calmer in the dim light! Light that shines through trees as I drive along, creating a strobe-like effect, can create a migraine. Also, a problem will develop if I’m watching a TV show or a movie and there are flashing lights. When I go to restaurants I always to sit where the light is behind me. I cannot sit where the light is in front of me. My granddaughters are the best, as they know this and they are always careful, looking out to make sure Grammy sits in the right chair.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I have used a variety of medications over the years and still use medication. I watch what I eat and make sure I’m eating the foods that work best for my body, avoiding my triggers. I also try to exercise regularly. Walking seems to be one of the easiest and best exercises of all. I went to a class on pain management that does not involve medication, where I learned among other things, breathing techniques. The diaphragmatic breathing I use often, especially at night before sleeping.

What does your migraine feel like?
I feel intense pain in the head, sharp/stabbing pain behind the left eye, and as the migraine progresses, pain in my joints. It feels like having the worst flu. It’s not just an extreme headache, it becomes a whole-body ache. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in the past, which I over-came by giving up eating wheat and sugar, but the joint-aches still return with most migraines even though I am not eating the bad foods. I basically feel a stabbing in the head, usually on the left side (in my earlier years it was on the right side, I don’t know why it shifted). Once the headache goes into full on migraine mode, it feels as if the entire left side of my face is melting. I feel the pain well into my jaw and radiates up over the top of my head. Combing or touching my head during the migraine is often painful. When my migraine has gone away and I comb my hair or touch my head, it feels like someone hit me with a 2×4.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
I think it was my neurologist who told me about it.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
As soon as I received the first Cefaly, I started using it nightly. I have used the device almost every night since, sometimes beyond the 20-minute session. I now have the Cefaly II and I really like that one. The Cefaly II is very handy because it is small. I do travel with it often. I take it wherever I go so I can continue to use it every night.

In the beginning it took me a few days to get used to the sensation because at first it was kind of strong but then it was OK. I remembered that a TENS unit helped me with my back pain and so I was very optimistic that Cefaly will continue to be helpful in managing my migraines. I believe in Cefaly. I would like to reduce the number of migraines I get each month. I am also using Cefaly to reduce and/or get off meds completely. I’m at an age where I really should be going off of medications; that would be the best thing for me.

What made you want to share your story?
I think the more we migraineurs share our stories with one another, the more we learn how to treat our migraines and hopefully treat our migraines with less medication. I don’t know that there is a lot of research out there in the field of treating diseases without medication and I’m all for treating our diseases/ailments without medication when possible.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Cefaly Can Help Migraineurs Miss Fewer Days of Work

Cefaly device

Cefaly, the first FDA-approved external trigeminal nerve stimulation device for the prevention of frequent episodic migraine attacks, is able to help some migraine patients miss fewer days of work, feel less groggy in the workplace, and enjoy more social activities. While the electronic, battery-powered, device is available by prescription-only, it is not a drug and does not have the side effects associated with medication, which means Cefaly users can use their device for 20-minutes before or after work, or during their lunch breaks, and prevent a migraine before it starts. The wearable prophylactic represents a first-line solution to productivity in the workplace, without the common sluggishness and other side effects often associated with traditional prescription medication.

Migraines affect 38 million people in the United States, according to the Migraine Research Foundation. Further, employers are said to lose more than $13 billion each year as a result of 113 million lost work days due to migraine. Migraine is the sixth most disabling illness in the world.

“I had to quit my job back in 2008 because of migraines, drop out of college, and stop driving,” said Lucas Layton, 30, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, who developed migraines following a pseudotumor. After nearly 100 different medications, years of emergency room runs, paralysis, and stroke-like symptoms, Lucas was ultimately hospitalized and began receiving disability pay.

In 2016 his neurologist suggested he try Cefaly. “It completely changed my life,” said Lucas, who now works full-time in retail, purchased a new car last month, and will be pursuing a nursing degree in January.

Lucas has been using the Cefaly device for nearly eight months each night before bed. He still takes one prescription medication as a preventive measure but has been able to eliminate the other drugs. In clinical trials, compliant Cefaly users experienced a 75% reduction in intake of migraine medication, and a 54% reduction in migraine attacks.

“The Cefaly device prevents me from having to call in sick,” explained Hannah Glover, 34, who works for an online company in North Little Rock, Arkansas. When Hannah feels a migraine coming on she uses the USB-rechargeable device right at her desk. “My co-workers call it ‘the mind-reading device’ in jest but I don’t care. I’m so thankful for the relief I just put it on.” Hannah tried several medications over the last 8-years but felt most migraine medications didn’t work well for her and often had unwanted side effects that made it hard to concentrate at her desk.

Only 4.3% of people reported side effects using the Cefaly device in clinical trials — all of which were minor and fully reversible. The palm-sized- device, works using a self-adhesive electrode that’s placed on the forehead and a magnetic connection, which sends tiny electrical impulses through the skin to desensitize the upper branches of the trigeminal nerve and reduce the frequency of migraine attacks.

While Cefaly is indicated for patients 18 years of age and older, after a decade of struggling with migraines, 17-year-old Tylar Mattingly of Mitchell, Indiana, was given a prescription for the device from her neurologist. “Tylar went from not wanting to leave her room to wanting to go and do things. She’s now active in fitness, she has a social life, her grades up,” said her mom, Amy. For the first time in her life, Tylar recently marked a full semester of perfect attendance.

Cefaly costs $349 and comes with a 60-day money back guarantee. A pack of three electrodes costs $25 and each electrode may be re-used up to 20 times. Cefaly® is available by prescription-only. Women who are pregnant or could become pregnant should check with their doctor before using Cefaly.

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Cefaly Introduces Option to Buy Now and Pay Later through PayPal Credit

CEFALY Technology announced today that Cefaly®, the first FDA-approved external trigeminal nerve stimulation device for the prevention of frequent episodic migraine attacks, will become available for purchase via PayPal Credit starting this June, in a nod toward Migraine Awareness Month. This means migraineurs who are approved by the online payments system, can get relief now and pay later, interest-free, for up to 6-months; making the $349 one-time cost for medical device less than $59 per month – when paid over a half-year period.

“We’re excited to offer migraineurs a way to more quickly find relief,” said Dr. Pierre Rigaux, the chief executive officer of CEFALY Technology, and a member of the team that invented the device. “By using Paypal Credit, we’ve found a way to make the Cefaly device more immediately accessible to people with migraines while we continue to work toward having the Cefaly device approved by insurance companies.”

Cefaly® is an electronic, battery-powered, prescription-only device that is placed on the forehead for 20-minutes once a day, using a self-adhesive electrode and a magnetic connection. The device sends tiny electrical impulses through the skin to desensitize the upper branches of the trigeminal nerve and reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. In clinical trials, compliant Cefaly® users experienced an 81% satisfaction rate, a 75% reduction in intake of migraine medication, and a 54% reduction in migraine attacks.

Cefaly® costs $349 and comes with a 60-day money back guarantee. A pack of three electrodes costs $25 and each electrode may be re-used up to 20 times. Cefaly® is available by prescription-only and indicated for patients 18 years of age and older. Women who are pregnant or could become pregnant should check with their doctor before using Cefaly®. Only 4.3% of people in clinical trials reported side effects — all of which were minor and fully reversible.

About CEFALY Technology
CEFALY Technology is a Belgium-based company, with US offices based in Wilton, Connecticut, specializing in electronics for medical applications. It has developed external cranial stimulation technology for applications in the field of neurology; in particular for treating migraines. For more information, visit http://www.cefaly.us. Find Cefaly on Twitter: @Cefaly, Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CefalyEN, and YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/CEFALYTechnology.

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