Robert has seen “much improvement” since he started using Cefaly

Name: Robert
Age: 77
Location: Aptos, California
Years with Migraines: 70
Occupation: Teacher (retired)
 
How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraines for more than 70 years. We used to think that what I had was the flu but when I was about 7 years old I was officially diagnosed with migraines.

When do you usually get migraines?
I’ve identified certain triggers over the years and if I don’t sleep it doesn’t help. I’m also very sensitive to light and use special sunglasses to help with this. I can’t eat chocolate. I can’t drink red wine; alcohol of any kind is a trigger. I shouldn’t eat cheese but sometimes I do anyway.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve tried everything and anything that’s out there. I’ve tried, oxygen, relaxation, biofeedback, different medications including topiramate, and finally my neurologist got me on neurotoxin injections every 12 weeks. When I have a migraine I also take a triptan.

What does your migraine feel like?
Before I started on the neurotoxin injections my migraines were pure throbbing pain I used to get an aura right before and have nausea afterward. I would also get vertigo after I’d had the migraine. I don’t have the throbbing pain since I started the neurotoxin injections. Now when I get the visual aura I’ll take a triptan for my head, stomach medicine to settle my stomach, and ibuprofen. I still feel kind of bad for a couple of days after but it’s not like it used to be.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
When Cefaly first got FDA approval I saw it on TV and then I went to my computer and went to the website to learn more.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I like it. It gets me to a relaxed state. The days I haven’t done it I know a migraine is coming so I’m pretty religious about doing it every day. I didn’t have to get used to the sensation. I’ve been full board with Cefaly for 20 minutes a day from the beginning and I’ve seen much improvement. I used to get migraines every single day and now I’m down to five times a month with the combination of Cefaly, neurotoxin injections, and the triptan. That’s pretty good for me.

What made you want to share your story?
Anything that will help other people with migraines should be talked about. I know some people that suffer from them and I’m always telling them my experience. I tell them to look into Cefaly and other treatments. It’s nice to be able to share my experience and hopefully somebody won’t have to got through the same things I did to get to this point. Now I’m retired but I was a teacher and I used to have to teach with a migraine and it was horrible and then I’d have to drive it was just awful. Migraines are very debilitating.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Kathy: Cefaly is a miracle invention

Name: Kathy
Age: 60
Location: near Charlotte, North Carolina
Years with Migraines: 27 years
Occupation: retired (environmental chemist) 

How long have you had migraines?
I have been a chronic migraine sufferer for over a decade, but have had severe migraines since the 1980s; they increased in both frequency and intensity in the last several years.

When do you usually get migraines?
I’ve identified my triggers. The list is ridiculously long.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I have tried many migraine preventatives, or attenuators. It’s been a very frustrating process as what works for an increment of time ceases to be effective. More often, however, there is no effect whatsoever. I currently take a combination of triptans that, if varied, do not boomerang into another headache. There are multiple environmental and dietary triggers for my migraines so that has resulted in many lifestyle changes. We rarely dine out, I survey the ingredient labels of all of the very few items that I buy with more than three ingredients. High fructose corn syrup can be a trigger, also garlic, onion, mushroom, msg, aspartame, sucralose, grape, mango, chocolate, etc. obviously this limits what I can eat to what I can prepare from scratch. Fragrances of any type are very risky. All of our acquaintances and family are aware of the problem this creates for me, so loved ones limit the perfume and aftershave they wear around me. However going to the symphony, for example, if I’m sitting near someone wearing perfume, or whose suit has been recently dry cleaned, I’m ill before the intermission and usually have to leave, since I’m with a group or with my husband, it doesn’t simply spoil it for me, it spoils it for everyone. So we just don’t go. Same with church, or any activity involving sitting in proximity to people unaware of the problem.

My husband and I were great travelers, however my sensitivity to the air fresheners and scented detergents and cleaners used in hotels condemn me to misery for the duration of my stay. So that’s off the table for the most part. If we can rent a house somewhere, we bring our own linens, and we travel there at a time of year where we do not need air conditioning or heat, and that works well.

What does your migraine feel like?
My migraines vary as they may occur at my left temple, over my right eye, or originate at the back of my head. A tension or sinus headache can trigger a migraine. I have been hospitalized several times over the course of my life due to intractability of a migraine. I once spent four days in the hospital trying to rid myself of one caused by mushrooms. (A friend did not believe me when I told her that I could not eat them, and she prepared a meal for us, swearing there were no mushrooms in it. She thought my sensitivity to mushrooms was imaginary. Apparently there was a heavy dose of them in our chicken dinner and it nearly killed me.) A severe migraine like that one will cause non-stop vomiting and very soon I am too weak and dehydrated and need IV liquids.

Over the years I have had many coping strategies to keep going. Sometimes, I won’t lie, it can be very depressing. However I have the support of family and friends, and I have an outlet with my horses, dogs, gardening, and reading. Audible books are wonderful comfort when migraines cause blurred vision such that I cannot read – and I listen to dozens of them in a year. My dogs are very much in tune with when I’m ill. I once had an english mastiff that would lie prone with me on the bathroom floor between vomiting sessions. She would lick the tears from my face. She always knew when I was not well and never left me during an episode of severe migraine. (I still miss her)

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My husband researched into the TENS devices used for migraine as an alternative treatment.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
The beauty (or one of several) is that the Cefaly does not have dramatic side effects like many of the medications. It has been a tremendous blessing for me! First of all, if I wake with a migraine (typical) and need medication, I can use the Cefaly for relief until the medication begins to take effect. I usually try one round with the Cefaly first to see if it will knock out the migraine without medication – and while that happens sometimes, it cannot be relied upon as a solo treatment. In many cases I still need medication to permanently displace the migraine. However, bearing the headache until the medicine works has been tremendously improved by the use of my Cefaly. I don’t know what I would do without it. Cefaly has reduced migraines, reduced the impact of migraine until medication works, and in some cases has eliminated the migraine without medication.

I alternate use of both the original (larger) Cefaly and the newer more portable one. The smaller one goes with me wherever I go. It’s wonderful for those middle of the night migraines because I can rest with my head on the pillow while wearing it, it is uncomplicated to position. It is simple to keep charged. The larger Cefaly is still a good alternative and I use it frequently as well. Generally I use it for the night time prophylaxis treatment my neurologist has recommended.

Also, I wanted to share that I ride horses when I’m not on medication (the medication affects balance so I cannot ride when taking pills)  – again Cefaly is tremendous in this regard. If it knocks out my headache, I can still ride on that day.  Riding is especially important to me, not only for the exercise and fun, but also because it is one of the few remaining artifacts of a normal life. For what portion of my life Cefaly has returned to me, I am exceedingly grateful.

What made you want to share your story?
For a person like me, this is a miracle invention, and it has improved my life and coping strategies with migraines enormously.

Cefaly is not a cure-all for my migraines, but it is indispensable to me as a coping strategy in dealing with chronic migraines. I would recommend it to anyone for its ability to effectively treat migraine pain, prevent and allay migraines. When one has the life altering effects of migraine to deal with chronically, a device like Cefaly is no doubt a life saver. If my experience could inspire someone to take a chance on it and receive a modicum of the relief I have had, then it is worth taking the time to write this to you.

My doctor has told me that my positive experience with Cefaly has resulted in his recommendations to other patients, and that they too have received relief. That’s a silver lining in my cloud, right there.

Migraines are a very lonely experience. Perhaps knowing that another person is also struggling with them may provide some comfort as well. And I believe that Cefaly is well worth trying – no sense in suffering needlessly if there is a remedy that works.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Amy has Fewer Migraines Since Using Cefaly

Name: Amy
Age: 44
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Years with Migraines: 20+
Occupation: Education Consultant

How long have you had migraines?
At least 20 years. I was in my 20s when they started happening; I don’t know what brought them on.

When do you usually get migraines?
I tend to get them at the end of the day. I’m an anxious sleeper and I’ve always known I grind my teeth, which doesn’t help, but at the end of the workday is about the time when I really start to feel a headache.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I feel like I’ve tried everything! I’ve seen many doctors and tried many different medications and supplements. I also did four rounds of neurotoxin injections, so a full year, but I didn’t think in the end it was that helpful to me either. I also tried acupuncture, chiropractic care and physical therapy.

What does your migraine feel like?
It’s changed over the years but now it sometimes feels like a pounding and at other times it feels like my head is on fire; it’s as if there is heat going through my head.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My doctor told me about it.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I’m just starting my third month using the Cefaly and within a month I was virtually headache-free. The second month using Cefaly I had one headache the whole month. The third month I’ve had a couple headaches but they’ve been pretty mild so I’m not too concerned. The good thing is now when I get a headache it’s mild and I don’t need my heavy-duty medication. I can just take an over the counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. I used to get headaches five times a week. They weren’t all migraines but the migraines were pretty intense a couple times a month. Now I would say the migraines are infrequent and mild. I’d say they went from a nine in intensity to much less frequent and a two or three in intensity.

What made you want to share your story?
People don’t all necessarily know about Cefaly as an option… I wanted to use my Cefaly long enough to really know I tried it out and see what I thought of it. Now that I’ve been using it at least a full two months I feel I can talk about it from real experience. I like it and it’s a better option for me than being on medicine because it doesn’t affect one’s liver. So I just thought if I could help get the message out, well, I’d like to help.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Deanna has less migraines and misses less work because of Cefaly!

Name: Deanna
Age: 45
Location: Portland, Oregon
Years with Migraines: 20+
Occupation: Registered nurse

 How long have you had migraines?
My migraines exacerbated in my early 20s when I took a medication for endometriosis called Lupron and since then they have continued to escalate. In addition to my migraines, I have chronic daily headaches that also started in my early 20s. I also had a combination of headaches and migraines that began in my early teens.

When do you usually get migraines?
I’m extremely sensitive to barometric pressure changes and a lot of my migraines are triggered by this. In addition to the changes in barometric pressure, my migraines can be triggered by: stress and foods (ie. Wines—esp. red wine; sharp cheeses; items with nitrites & sulfites—ie. pickles, sausages, bacon; MSG).

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve tried multiple medications including anti-depressants, antiepileptics, antiemetics, and triptans.I have also tried medications given via a nasal spray and also by self-administered injections. Currently, every three months I receive a neurotoxin injections and on a daily basis I take three preventive medications: an anti-depressant, an antiepileptic, and a calcium channel blocker. When my migraines exacerbate I will take a triptan. If my home medications do not work I will go in to the hospital for infusion treatments of an ergot alkaloid and a combination of other medications.

What does your migraine feel like?
When I have a migraine it’s like an extreme vice grip, a tightness across the frontal area of my head. I also get an ice pick, stabbing feeling behind my right eye. Also, when I have a migraine that lasts longer than a few days I develop facial numbness and tingling. During my migraines I am very photophobic, phonophobic and extremely sensitive to smells/scents.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My neurologist told me about it.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
Since starting Cefaly my migraines have decreased. My first time using Cefaly was extremely weird. I had to get used to the device, but it took me about three or four treatments to get used to the sensation, which is difficult to describe. I am used to it now, but still at times I am not able to “ramp” my Cefaly II up to its full frequency. My Cefaly has helped me by decreasing the frequency and/or duration of my migraines and it has helped me decrease the amount of rescue medications that I use.

What made you want to share your story?
I used to miss anywhere from one to two days days of work every pay period and now I might miss one day a week every 3 months! I feel a lot of that is due to Cefaly. I just feel it is important to share information with others who may be suffering and let them know that there are other alternative treatments available on the market.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Eric: I get far fewer headaches than I used to

Name: Eric
Age: 35
Location: New York, NY
Years with Migraines: 25
Occupation: Commercial real estate

How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraines going back probably 25 years, since 4th or 5th grade. My first one was on a New Year’s Eve when I was 10 years old. I think for me it’s just genetic and runs down my mother’s side of the family.

When do you usually get migraines?
I have a bunch of triggers: atmospheric and weather changes, muscle tension, stress, and lack of sleep, are the main ones. On the food side, red wine is a major trigger for me.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve been on daily medication for the better part of 13 years. At this point I’ve tried anti-psychotic drugs, anti-epileptics, anti-depressants, migraine-specific medications, and others. It’s been trial and error but I have a good routine, working with limited side effects now. I also do quarterly neurotoxin injections, I’ve done that for the last 4 years. I also get massages once a month to keep muscle tension at bay. I added Cefaly to my routine 3 years ago. I find that some combination of those things has had success at keeping them at bay. Right now I’m on an old school anti-depressant as a daily preventive and I take a medication that’s a combination of sumatriptan and naproxen for acute onset pain.

What does your migraine feel like?
It feels like a vice clamping down on the right side of my head; the right temple. I also feel severe throbbing pressure behind my right eye. When it gets really bad I get tingling and numbness down my left extremities. It’s always the right side of my head and my left extremities.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My neurologist recommended it to me and I’ve since recommended it to my mother.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I still get the major heavy duty headaches but Cefaly has really limited the low level headaches I would get three to four times a week. Those nuisance headaches that can encumber my daily activities, those seem to really have been curtailed by the Cefaly. I use my device daily for 20 minutes, usually at night. I get far fewer headaches than I used to. The headaches that are not a regular headache (but not a full blown migraine either) those types of headaches Cefaly has really cut down on those. So it doesn’t totally prevent the full-blown migraines for me but it eliminates a good amount of low level headaches and it makes it so I get the bad ones less frequently.

What made you want to share your story?
If there’s something out there that can help then I want people to know about it. There are other people like me trying everything and anything to make these go away and if there’s a device out there that can help some people and I’ve come across it I should let people know. Like my wife said, “If it’s helping you, it can help other tell other people, and you should be telling other people about it.” I think it’s great that this is a device and it’s non-invasive. I don’t want to take more medication if I can avoid it.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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