Marsha is happy she stuck with Cefaly

First Name: Marsha
Age: 69
Location: Waterford, VA
Occupation: Housewife

How long have you had migraines?
I started in my 20s very infrequently, but about 8 years ago it got much, much worse. I was having 20 or so a month.

When do you usually get migraines?
If I don’t eat on time, get overly tired, work out (which I do twice a week) or sometimes I will wake up in the middle of the night with one.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
My general practitioner gave me Indomethacin. I tried acupuncture (didn’t do anything). My neurologist gave me Propranolol for prevention which works and Sumatriptan which usually makes it go away within one hour.

What does your migraine feel like?
It feels like a spike is being driven into one side of my head about 2 inches.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
I was watching CNBC and they had a news blurb that a new device called Cefaly was approved by the FDA for treatment and prevention of migraines. I ordered it a couple of days later.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
The first time I used it, I thought, “I’m going to have to send this thing back” because it was soooo painful. But I decided to ease into it instead. I used it for 5 minutes at first and gradually added a minute as it became more tolerable. Eventually I would even fall asleep within 5 minutes of putting it on. I use it without fail every single night, even on vacation. The Cefaly has greatly lessened the pain of my migraines. If I have a severe migraine, I will put it on and it helps relieve the pain until the sumatriptan kicks in. With the Cefaly, medication and changes to my diet, I am down to about 4 migraines a month.

What made you want to share your story?

My neurologist told me some of his patients had give up on Cefaly because they couldn’t tolerate it. I want people to know they can get used to it if they ease into it. And they will be so happy that they stuck with it.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Debbie: my migraines started dissipating

Name: Debbie
Age: 60
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ
Years with Migraines: 17
Occupation: management consultant

How long have you had migraines?
I started getting migraines when I discovered I had undiagnosed Lyme’s Disease for over a year & then, concurrently, developed Fibromyalgia – all about 17 yrs. ago.

When do you usually get migraines?
My migraines are stress-related, tension goes right into my neck!

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve tried medications, supplements, hot and cold compresses, warm baths, massages, etc.

What does your migraine feel like?
My migraines have an incredibly sharp, throbbing  pain. They’re in the front & sides of my head. They last for three days and make it difficult to work or really function well.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
I was researching migraine solutions and saw an ad for it on the internet. I went to the website and started reading & investigating it. I’m very big on alternative treatments – this is how I discovered my Lyme’s Disease and Fibromyalgia.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I started using the Cefaly very rigorously, everyday for 6 months straight. I’d continue to take sumatriptan as needed, and added massages as preventative body work – catch the migraine before it happens! After doing it for that time period, my migraines started dissipating. I was having them two to three times a month. They started decreasing dramatically and I got to the point where I didn’t need the Cefaly everyday. I could go 1-2 months without them. I do still get them but they’re very spread out. Now, I use my Cefaly maybe once a month. I’ve been using the Cefaly now for 3 years in total.

What made you want to share your story?
People who have migraines deal with tremendous pain and frustration…it feels like there’s nothing you can do about it but suffer and this mindset impacts every aspect of one’s life! Everybody has a different migraine experience and I don’t think there’s just one solution but I think there’s always something you can do about it. I think Cefaly makes a huge difference. When my daughter started getting migraines in her mid-twenties, I told her about the Cefaly and now she uses it, too. I think more people should know that it’s an option. There are a lot of people that don’t know about treating the external trigeminal nerve. I think it’s much better than adding more medication or suffering! I just want people to know about it’s availability! I tell everyone I hear talking about migraines about it. I send people to the website all the time.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Lisa finds Cefaly effective in her migraine toolkit

Name: Lisa
Age: 50
Location: Seattle, WA
Years with Migraines: 30+
Occupation: program management

How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraines probably for more than 30 years. I don’t know what started them.

When do you usually get migraines?
I haven’t been able to very reliably identify triggers but there are certain things that seem to contribute to or aggravate, my migraine: bright lights, stress, certain foods (like soy and dairy), over-exertion, things like that.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve tried medical prescriptions for both prevention and acute treatments but most medications didn’t seem to work and came with side effects. That said, I have found some to be effective, such as Diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory for acute treatment, Promethazine for nausea, and Amitriptyline, an anti-depressant, that helps as a preventive in my case. I’ve also used various herbal remedies such as feverfew and lemongrass tea, magnesium, ginger and turmeric all of which have been very helpful. And I’ve done some food elimination work.

What does your migraine feel like?
I have both chronic migraine and cervicogenic headache, so it can be hard to know when the migraine is starting to flare up. I have pain on the right side of my head (both stabbing and throbbing), nausea and sensitivity to light and smells, accompanied by some dizziness, fatigue and difficulty thinking and finding words.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My neurologist recommended it. She takes a multi-modal approach, which is why I use a number of things to prevent and treat my headaches. The Cefaly device is a standard in her toolkit and I’ve found it to be quite effective.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I’ve been using the Cefaly device for more than 3 years. It took several days to get used to the sensation but my doctor told me to expect that. I use it every night before bed since it can cause drowsiness (a good thing at bedtime!). I primarily use it as a preventive but I do use it as an acute treatment as well. There was one time where I couldn’t take my preventive or herbal supplements because I was going to have surgery in a few weeks but I was able to use the Cefaly during that time. I would say that in tandem with everything else that I’m doing, it’s made the headache significantly less impactful. I believe Cefaly helps lessen the severity and duration of my migraines, and reduces the impact that the migraines are having on me. I’d say before Cefaly I was regularly at a pain level of six and now for the most part I’m able on most days to maintain a pain level of a two or below.

What made you want to share your story?
I feel like migraine is still very much a stigmatized condition. The more information that is out there, the more empowered people will be to find treatments that work for them. The Cefaly device does not seem to be well-known, and the more migraine sufferers that know about this device, the better. Most people I talk to are not aware of its existence, and I think that’s a disservice because it can be so beneficial.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Less intense and less frequent migraines

Name: Orit
Age: 60
Location: Huntington, MI
Years with Migraines: 50+
Occupation: veterinarian

How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraine since I was a child.

When do you usually get migraines?
For so many migraines as I have, I have no idea what starts them. There are probably multiple triggers. After I have a migraine I notice bright lights are uncomfortable and loud sounds are uncomfortable. Sometimes the weather seems to be a trigger. If I don’t sleep enough or if I’m stressed out, it can also lead to a migraine.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve been on so many preventive and rescue medications for years. I also tried biofeedback but it was not for me. I tried exercise to realign my spine and acupuncture but they didn’t do anything. I was mainly using sumatriptan as a rescue drug but I stopped taking it because of too many side effects.

What does your migraine feel like?
My migraine usually hurts on one side of the head and in the back of my eyes. It also hurts inside my ears and I feel a little nauseous; sometimes I throw up but not every time. My brain definitely doesn’t think as well as when I don’t have a migraine. I will often feel a little bit of confusion with the migraine and the light and the noise hurt.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
I’d read about it before. I have family in Belgium and somebody sent me a little blurb about it, then I saw it in a magazine I thought it was too new age-y and weird but when my neurologist suggested it, I thought I should try it.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I started using the Cefaly a couple of years ago. It’s decreased the intensity and frequency of my migraines. I use the regular Cefaly three times in a row to make it go away. I’ve noticed I use less medication now. In October I took four sumatriptan when I normally would’ve taken 10. In November I only took two and in December only one. It’s been amazing and I’ve not had bad migraines since I started using the device. My migraines are less painful now and less intense.

What made you want to share your story?
When I talked to Cefaly customer service about upgrading to a new device and how grateful I was because the Cefaly was working so well, he asked if I wanted to give a testimonial and I said sure. The Cefaly is working for me and maybe it can help someone else too.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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Migraine Abortion Trial Shows Positive Results for Cefaly Acute Medical Device

The Cefaly® Acute medical device, cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two months ago for the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura, was also successful in a recent trial for migraine abortion; and predominantly outperformed published data on triptans as well as medical drugs currently under investigation for the acute treatment of migraine.

Previous pilot and pivotal trials (ACME1) demonstrated the efficacy and safety of the Cefaly® Acute for the acute treatment of migraine attacks and led to the FDA approval. The new trial on migraine abortion was identical to the design used to test abortive migraine medication, including medications already on the market (triptans) and the new drugs still under medical investigation: Lasmiditan, Ubrogepant and Rimegepant.

The outcome at 2-hours of using Cefaly® Acute showed that 70.8% of patients had pain relief, 35.4% were pain-free, and 60.4% were free from the most bothersome symptom (MBS). In comparison, available data on Lasmiditan2 shows 59% of patients had pain relief at 2-hours, 32.2% were pain free and 40.9% were MBS-free; for Ubrogepant3 pain relief at 2-hours was 58.8%, while 25.5% of patients were pain free; and for Rimegepant4 at 2-hours pain relief was at 61.2%, with 32.9% of patients pain free. At the 24-hour mark, sustained pain freedom with Cefaly® Acute was 25% of patients. In contrast, Ubrogepant showed 21.6%, while Rimegepant demonstrated 28.2%.

Based on these encouraging positive results CEFALY Technology is now moving forward with a Phase 3 clinical trial in the US that is scheduled to be completed by the end of the year.

Usual acute treatment for migraine attacks are triptans but these medications have several important shortcomings: a significant number of migraineurs are unresponsive to triptans; they are contraindicated for patients having cardiovascular problems; they can cause significant side effects; and excessive triptan intake leads to medication overuse headache, a major cause of migraine chronification.

“We’ve made huge technical advances in recent years that have led to new device generations that are much more efficient than before. Recent improvements led to the Cefaly® Acute and now the new clinical data shows that it offers the best solution for the abortive treatment of migraine,” said Dr. Pierre Rigaux, the chief executive officer of CEFALY Technology. “We are very excited by these results and eager to begin Phase 3 to provide full evidence that Cefaly® Acute as the first line abortive migraine therapy offers better efficacy than the triptans, fulfilling patients’ unmet needs, and having next-to-no side effects, while remaining the cheapest overall treatment.”

About Migraine
Migraine is the leading cause of disability among neurological disorders in the United States according to the American Migraine Foundation5.  An estimated 39 million Americans suffer from migraine.  Migraine can be extremely disabling and costly, accounting for more than an estimated $36 billion in direct (e.g. doctor visits, medications) and indirect (e.g. missed work, lost productivity) expenses each year in the United States.

About CEFALY Technology
CEFALY Technology is a Belgium-based company, with US offices based in Wilton, Connecticut, specializing in electronics for medical applications. It has developed external cranial stimulation technology for applications in the field of neurology; in particular for treating migraines. For more information, visit http://www.cefaly.us. Find Cefaly on Twitter: @Cefaly and on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CefalyEN

1 Acute Treatment of Migraine With e-TNS (ACME). U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02590939. September 13, 2017

2 CoLucid Pharmaceuticals press release. CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, Inc. https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2016/09/06/869611/0/en/CoLucid-Pharmaceuticals-Announces-Achievement-of-Both-Primary-and-Key-Secondary-Endpoints-in-the-SAMURAI-Phase-3-Pivotal-Trial-of-Lasmiditan-in-Migraine.html. September 6, 2016.

3 A phase IIb randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ubrogepant for the acute treatment of migraine. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27269043. June 6, 2016.

4 BMS-927711 for the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, dose-ranging trial. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23965396. August 21, 2013.

5 Migraine facts. Migraine Research Foundation website. http://migraineresearchfoundation.org/about-migraine/migraine-facts/. Accessed January 23, 2018.

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