First Name: Carol
Age: 69
Location: Greensboro, NC
Years with Migraines: 60+
Occupation: musician/conductor/voice teacher

How long have you had migraines?
I’ve had migraines my entire life.

When do you usually get migraines?
I have certain triggers, living in North Carolina I’m tremendously bothered by changes of barometric pressure. I’m still on topiramate as a preventive and I’m on rizatriptan benzoate tablets as an abortive.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve been exposed to every type of solution but very little has worked. I’ve tried many different medications but they’ve had many side effects. Over time, some of the medications that did work got lost on me and stopped helping.

What does your migraine feel like?
I know immediately which side it’s going to be on. I have a 20-minute aura. It’s a severe, burning, pounding pain – predominantly on the right side. You can see it on me. You can look at me and instantly know if I have a migraine and what side it’s on. I have severe nausea and need to lie down. I can’t move. I can’t see people moving or it makes it worse.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My doctor recommended it. The first time she told me I laughed. The second time she mentioned it, two months later, I thought I’d give it a try. Cefaly has taken away 98% of my migraines.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I got my Cefaly in 2015 and I have had a wonderful experience. I had to go on disability in 2005. I had a concussion, just fell on the sidewalk carrying some books and then started having 4 to 5 migraines a week. I was a conductor, a church musician and an organist. I had a group and would sing all over the world and I had to give it up. I’d been mostly in bed for 10-years. I tried everything, been everywhere – clinics, hospitals, etc. Then my doctor recommended Cefaly and now I’m living my life. I use it every night for 20-minutes.

What made you want to share your story?
Cefaly has given me my life back. I want everybody to know how wonderful this is. I had to go on disability and I’m so much better. If my story can help somebody else I want them to know how much Cefaly has helped me.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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If you’re a migraine sufferer, chances are you’ve experienced a migraine at work; and probably at the most inopportune time: right before a big presentation, during an important one-on-one with your boss, or early in the morning with a jam-packed day. While the migraines can be debilitating, they’re also frustrating – and you’re not alone if you feel overwhelmed. More than 157 million workdays are lost each year in the US to migraine, according to the Migraine Research Foundation.

So, what can you do to minimize the chances of getting a migraine at work? The key may be to mind your triggers.

Many migraineurs say overhead lighting is a big trigger. Others tell us workplace perfumes, colognes, and air fresheners are to blame. Every headache is different and what triggers one may remedy another, or another person’s, which makes bulk solutions difficult to come by. Most migraine sufferers; however, will agree that changes in sleep and mealtimes will usually cue a throbbing head.

At work, many things are outside one’s control but not everything.

Here are five things you can do to help prevent a migraine:

Manage the light: You may not be able to switch your seating arrangement but maybe you can dim the lights, or bring a desk lamp, or swap a lightbulb in an existing lamp. If you’re near a window, see if you can lower the blinds or swivel your seat so the natural light is to your side – or better yet — behind you, instead of straight on.

Stay hydrated: Dehydration is a common migraine trigger but if you stay hydrated, you can likely avoid a migraine. Bring your own cup or water bottle and refill it often during the day. Limit your amount of caffeine. A recent study showed that three cups of a caffeinated beverage, like coffee, could cause an aching head. Along this same line of thought, avoid salty foods as they can also dehydrate you.

Eat lunch: Eat your lunch every day – and if possible, eat it at the same time every day. Pack some easy-to-sneak snacks in case a meeting runs over. Also considering keeping some healthy options stashed in a desk drawer to prevent hunger pains and possibly eating something else in a preventive panic without the available time to check the ingredients for food triggers.

Map your route: Make note of colleagues who wear strongly scented perfumes or colognes and find alternate ways to navigate the office. It may not be possible to avoid scents that trigger your migraine but you can minimize your exposure.

Use Cefaly: Whether you’re on a conference call or your lunch break, grab your Cefaly for a quick 20-minute PREVENT session (or an hour-long ACUTE session and find relief fast). The Cefaly device will help desensitize the Trigeminal nerve, which is considered the pain center for migraine. Over time, you’ll be able to reduce your migraine days. In the meantime, Cefaly can could be your go-to treatment on days where you cannot afford the common side effects typical of some migraine medications. This way, when your session is over, you can get back to work. In fact, many people can continue to work throughout their session too.

Drinking too much coffee (or other caffeinated drinks) may be a trigger for migraines if you’re already prone to severe headaches, according to a recent study in The American Journal of Medicine. But how much is too much?

Researchers found that drinking three or more caffeinated beverages a day was tied to a higher likelihood of experiencing a migraine, among people with periodic migraine. Luckily for caffeine lovers, the study also found one or two caffeinated drinks a day were generally not considered a tipping point toward a migraine.

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health analyzed information from nearly 100 adults who experienced migraine headaches at least twice a month, but no more than 15 times a month. Participants filled out an online survey twice a day for six weeks to record their caffeine intake and noted if they experienced a migraine headache that day.

“While some potential triggers – such as lack of sleep – may only increase migraine risk, the role of caffeine is particularly complex, because it may trigger an attack but also helps control symptoms,” said Elizabeth Mostofsky, who led the researchers; in a press release. The study was the first to examine the daily relationship between caffeine intake and the onset of migraine.

Overall, participants were more likely to experience migraine headaches on days they consumed three or more caffeinated beverages, compared with days they didn’t consume any.

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First Name: Cheyenne
Age: 29
Location: Dayton, OH
Years with Migraines: 16
Occupation: Analyst

How long have you had migraines?
About 16 years.

When do you usually get migraines?
I can get migraines at any point; however, sometimes I have triggers. If someone has a really strong perfume, or any strong scent, that could trigger it. While it’s not always a trigger, I am sensitive to light and smells.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
I’ve tried dozens of things. I’ve tried multiple different seizure medications and nothing was working in terms of daily medication. Once the doctor noticed daily medications were not helping the frequency or pain, we tried pills, nasal sprays, and injections to decrease the pain of when I do have them.

What does your migraine feel like?
It’s like a bunch of thick needles throbbing in the back of my head and the pain slowly moves its way up my head to the back of my eyes. Then it feels like it takes over my whole skull.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My neurologist told me about it. I actually went to see a different neurologist because I was pregnant and I was trying to find something I could use during my pregnancy and he recommended the Cefaly device.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I only had the preventative at first and I loved it. I’d use it preventively but also would use it two to three times to abort a migraine, so when I saw the Dual I got on it right away and love it. It’s really helping and I’m off all my medication. Every once in a while I’ll get a migraine in the back of my head and Cefaly will help decrease the severity of it but it won’t get rid of it completely. Cefaly has most definitely been helpful for me. I’ve been medication free for almost a year now. When I do have a migraine I can just put the device on. I have an 11-month old daughter so when I’m home taking care of her I can put on my device and keep going with whatever I was doing.

What made you want to share your story?
When I was talking with a couple people about the device their biggest fear was the price and it not working. I’d tell them they could try it and get their money back with the 60-day guarantee if it didn’t work but the price was still a concern. As a person with migraines and as a mom, I wanted to vouch for this and say this product does work and I think it was worth every penny.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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First Name: Patricia
Age: 58
Location: Muskogee, Oklahoma
Years with Migraines: 46
Occupation: Teacher (retired)

How long have you had migraines?
I had my first migraine when I was 12; so 46 years.

When do you usually get migraines?
The only triggers I have are getting too hot, too cold, not enough sleep, and then the smell of oranges and red grapes.

What have you tried pre-Cefaly?
So, I taught school before I got married in 1983. The next year my migraines increased to an average of one a week. After our family doctor tried several medications, I was referred to a neurologist who ran several tests. Then I was told, “you were single, you got married, you moved from the city to the country, you were teaching and now you are a homemaker. You have had a lot of changes in your life and you’re under stress. When you get control of the stress of your life – your migraines will stop.” I burst into tears and he said, “see I told you, you were under stress!”

I did not go back to a neurologist for close to 30 years. My migraines kept building in frequency and length. The only thing that seemed to truly help was getting narcotic shots that would totally knock me out. To function while I had a migraine, I took lots of narcotics. I often said if I didn’t have a migraine, I had a headache. I had 3-5 migraines a week…. many lasting days. In the fall of 2012 I was put on a synthetic extended release morphine pill. I had pain free days for the first time in years! Then in December we were informed my insurance would no longer cover them. I was switched to oxycodone. My colon promptly shut down prompting two hospital stays —- the first a week the second almost two weeks. I could not even take acetaminophen for almost the next year. Desperate, I tried a neurologist again who suggested I try a Cefaly device. He had no real knowledge of them at the time but had just heard of them.

What does your migraine feel like?
My head is either going to explode or implode and a really cold spoon, if you could scoop out behind my eye, it would feel really good. I’d like to just scoop that area out.

How did you hear about Cefaly?
My neurologist suggested the Cefaly device.

What’s your Cefaly experience like?
I went to a neurologist after staying away from them for 30-years after a bad experience. This time, I went out on the Internet and looked for bad reviews of what was being prescribed, which was a Cefaly — I only found six bad ones and two of those acknowledged that they had not used the machine properly. The rest were all miracle stories, like “used it and have never had another migraine.” My success with Cefaly was almost immediate. My results were different but just as amazing. Immediately my migraines dropped back to approximately one a week. I also had a decrease in the intensity. My eyes are still very light sensitive but I very rarely reach the nauseous stage anymore. I still cannot sleep them off but I very rarely have to knock myself out anymore.

What made you want to share your story?
This device gave me back my life! I don’t go anywhere without it, it’s my constant companion. It just changed my life. I was on so many drugs and I couldn’t drive. I couldn’t be depended upon to do anything. Now I have my life back.

Want to share your story too? We’d love to hear from you! Please send an email to m DOT coder AT cefaly DOT us. Please include your name, contact information, and let us know where you’re located so we can set up a good time to talk.

If you’re wondering if Cefaly is right for you, click here for more information and, of course, check with your doctor.

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